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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 65 (some duplicates have been removed)
very >>> you listed the first institute, eleanor roosevelt and you commented on her on a rather sensitive area. son, franklin, jr. in 1916 after 11 years of her congegal duties completed. longer wanted to have intimate relations witcer. it would last a lifetime. it was lucy mercer in fact, not eleanor roosevelt at nen 45. separately. it's been said that you have roosevelt was lesbian and that is also brought up a an assertion by you. are you sure of all thi data? >> i'm fairly confident. you know there was a eleanor roosevelt written b blaven cook and she was the evidence thattel by sexual orientation if no a lesbian one. >> letters >> based largeor upi. she was a wire reporter. and she began covering her when she was still in new york and later continued into the white house and in in the white house >> which came first? mercer the alleged by you roosevelt, or hick ocnating part of the early life i'm interested in perhaps doing something more on, prab book in and of itself, going a separate house which was the roosevelt family estate and lived with two other women in this house
library, as far as i could see. one was eleanor roosevelt, and the other was the duchess of windsor. [laughter] and i can even buy nine or 10, had had quite enough of eleanor roosevelt. and so i chose the duchess of windsor, and i brought it home, and my mother asked me what i was doing, and i said well, i'm writing this book report on the duchess of windsor's biography because she's an admirable woman. and my mother got incensed. and she said, admirable? what did she ever do in her life except marry somebody she shouldn't have? [laughter] so i learned the lesson, and i took the books back and turned it in, and, of course, did the inevitable eleanor roosevelt. but i sort of got imprinted i think very early on, you use biography as a way of exploring that which you, that which was my. and my mother was right, to keep me from the duchess of windsor. i think that we're all very lucky that it didn't start writing biographies earlier because i probably would have produced the definitive biography of hopalong cassidy. [laughter] when i was six, going even further back, whenever they wante
it to be. eleanor roosevelt probably still the most outspoken fairslydy. she had press conferences. penned a column. she had different views than her husband and was outspoken about them. and interestingly, when hillary clinton was first lady, and she was getting a lot of heat for being out front on policy issues under her husband's administration, she would imagine discussing the things with eleanor roosevelt and getting advice of eleanor roosevelt. i think they have latitude to do with the office what they will and i think they feel like this first lady really done a great job highlighting issues not partisan and need to be addressed in the country. >> yeah. funny how you never hear o outspoken applied to men. one third grader taking the first lady's let's move campaign. iowa's mason and third grade basketball team tied up at the buzzer in overtime and mason sunk a half court buzzer beater driving them to third grade victory. number 12 celebrating with the teammates. nice job. our facebook fans are helping the video go viral and weighing in on what the lessons the pros can learn from mas
right now in your book, "the rebellious life of mrs. rosa parks" of rosa parks and eleanor roosevelt just before a civil rights rally. >> rosa parks needs eleanor roosevelt. she is traveling and raising money, building the profile of the movement. alan their roosevelt, the head of highlander, she meets them. he said, you told her she was going to get a renovated, right? eleanor is aware if somebody stands up for civil rights in 1955. the picture in the book, there is a major civil rights rally here, fund-raiser organized by ella baker, in madison square garden. the picture also includes the woman who desegregates the driver's seat of the alabama briefly before she is kicked out for the ride that ensues when she desegregates the university. it is a beautiful picture right before the big demonstration, rally here in new york. >> how did rosa parks fit into the black power movement? >> she moved to detroit in 1957 and her activism continues, in terms of working against and challenging racism of this new home town, the jim crow no.. jobs, housing, police brutality. she is extremely activ
in 1943 by president franklin eleanor roosevelt work projects administration to provide the city's families with care and education for preschool age children during world war ii. whereas eed began with four sites. today eed has grown to 43 sites that serve over 4,000 students including infants, toddlers, preschool opportunities, transitional kindergarten, other students and tk as well as fifth grade students during non school hours. over 90% receive completely free or subsidized care based on their family income and more than 75% of families served a language other than english at home. whereas sfusd's strategic plan contains three main goals: access and equity, student achievement and accountability, and calls out the achievement gap as one of the greatest civil rights issues facing the district. whereas decades of research has shown that providing children with early education opportunities can have significant positive impact on their growth and academic achievement. in addition for students from families who face economic linguistic and other opportunity barriers the n
or iesco wilson or eleanor roosevelt or mamie eisenhower, you can see that each woman has defined the in a way that is true to herself. how she can help her husband take care of her family, make her contribution to our nation. quick c-span's new original series, "first ladies," produced with the white house historical association. season one begins february 18 at nine: 00 p.m. eastern and pacific. >> if you go to most american history textbooks, if you go back to the textbooks in high school, in your american history textbooks, if you go to the index, you will find no tension of eugenics. if you go to your biology books in high school, you would find no mention of the word "eugenie cs." i looked at a biology book assigned to most classes here. great textbooks. i did not see any mention of eugenics. it is as if because we no longer believe in it, we do not have to think about it. we know eugenics was so awful we can somehow pretend that it was not part of american culture. early 20th-anin century history. saturday night at at 8:00 pm eastern. postmaster general patrick donahoe anno
and making it worse? that's how you judge people. not by the size of their tush. >> eleanor roosevelt was really a transformative figure as first lady. >> also not -- >> exactly. >> we all have the human declaration of human rights. we have it written down on paper because of eleanor roosevelt and the united nations. let's judge the quality of the character, please. >> now breaking news this morning. united states postal service effective in august, we're hearing, is going to stop saturday delivery of the mail. >> has anyone really noticed? >> you will now. >> they say it will save about $2 billion a year. you can still go into a post office on saturday and get -- packages will still be delivered. >> packages, right? >> some will say this will be one of the final death nails for snail mail. >> taking post hold to a whole new level. >> e-mail and twitter and all this, there's still -- there's something special about getting a handwritten card or note. >> true. >> you hope that never goes away. >> it won't if we don't let it. >> i think the post office, everybody appreciates the postal
and eleanor roosevelts that we heard about, some of these women their names have been lost to history. those shows ex-kite us even more because the entire program will be something new for people. >> shannon: there are some stories behind the men and, of course, they are the headliner especially a hundred years ago they are the only ones that -- we didn't have the internet and none of the first ladies were tweeting and we didn't know what was going on with them. did you find that many times the first ladies were sort of really the ones to help push their husband's agenda or push ideas that they thought the president should be acting on? >> very much so. from early on first ladies are a lot more outspoken than maybe we see or that history portrayed them. abigail adams was telling her husband from the very beginning if you don't remember the ladies and keep them in mind you will have real problems. and she is the second first lady of the united states. so to be out that forefront in thinking and abolition, there were a lot of mixture between north and south and a lot of first ladies took stand
of expectations you're not going to make history. you're not going to be an eleanor roosevelt unless a woman of her generation was willing to step out of the normal first lady role take a more public position on issues that were important to her. whether i agreed with her issues or not, you won't succeed. >> rose: you've made history because of this appointment to the supreme court. do you want to make history in terms of what you do on the bench? >> well, if what you're talking about is that somehow you're going to write opinions that are going to create whole cloth a new direction for the courttor society -- >> rose: yes. >> you don't want to do that? >> no. >> rose: why not? >> because i'm a great respecter of the law. >> rose: can't you respect the law and believe the law is imperfect? >> absolutely. and that's why -- >> rose: believe that you may have the opportunity in the sense? think of brown. have board of education. >> absolutely. and there may be a case. >> rose: that's a historic decision! and there may be a case in which i look at what our precedents have been and enough time an
as secretary of state? certainly say that the most powerful woman in american history was eleanor roosevelt. like it or not. to paraphrase another political voice. hillary is no eleanor. she hasn't been a bad secretary of state, she has beened me okay kerr. around average, maybe slightly below average. >> ending with benghazi in the last day on the job, you know turkey attack, that's not saying it was her fault. >> i don't think she moved the ball forward. but also to be fair to hillary, she was doing obama's foreign policy, which was the reset with russia and we're going to deal with putin basically a re-set with iran. don't met with hugo chavez. so, i will cut her slack on that. none the less, i think she was energetic, very hard working and dedicated. >> just not sure what her influence was in the end. let's move on to the turkey situation. in ankara, this bombing today, what does this tell us about where we are in the world. turkey an important ally in the united states. they have their own troubles. >> attacks on u.s. embassies and other u.s. installations or new companies that's the n
the times in which they lived? >> i think eleanor roosevelt is a good example of that. she was into everything. she remained so even into the kennedy era. i was amazed to learn that she regretted that she had never gone to college. i have -- i was shocked she had never gone. she was home school and went academies. i suppose she had an equivalent of what we would consider a college education. on the cutting edge of every reform -- and one of the reasons was she did not have to stay at home. there was someone there to be the secretary and housekeeper for her husband. she was all over the place. i think she is a good example of the growing influence of the 1920's and women's growing liberation. the idea that women can get out into more -- that coincides with the women's suffrage era as well. >> i was going to say -- looking at the first lady, you can pretty much tell what is or is not happening with american women at any given point in the historical past. i think the present a particular window on the past. everybody knows the position of first lady. whether you know in parti
at at that point. >> one of my favorite people historically period is eleanor roosevelt. i think she's so incredible, activist in her own right, even before she became first lady. she was at first depressed about being the sort of hostess and the wife and playing that role so she continued doing what she was doing, she wrote a syndicated column, she gave press conferences and she was the first first lady to speak at her husband's convention and after her husband passed, she had an active role in public life and she actually disagreed with her husband, something we still don't see first ladies do. how did she broke the mold of first ladies? >> you're right, she's the first first lady to hold press conferences. the interesting thing is only women reporters are allowed to be at the press conference. the stodgy owners of newspapers have to hire women reporters. if you look at where you all are, maybe it doesn't happen as quickly. she certainly was a trend setter and she was one of those first first ladies to really get out in the television era, she's using the media in radio shows and addres
and now to the rented auditorium, cafeteria, and gym at eleanor roosevelt high school. >> on sunday, 57 new converts came to jesus christ and that is the most important thing that can happen. what takes place is small in comparison to a soul that is saved. >> reporter: the board invited another minister in his congregation to move in to their expansive facilities. and some of the longtime congregants believe that board is self-appointed. >> according to the defendants, there are only six people in the 10,000-member church that have a right to a vote. and they vote for themselves. >> the suit by the congregants s asking the courts to install a neutral party to run an election for the church board. the tarp for the board declined an on-camera interview and said the board of jericho church is committed to carrying out the a possibles and both sides express confidence they will prevail in court and have yet to issue the final rulings. we'll stay tuned. this is not over. >> i know you're watching for us. thank you. >>> a former maryland delegate was laid to rest today. they said goodbye to t
luther king, jr., eleanor roosevelt, fannie lou hamer, ella baker, bobby kennedy, constance rice, and perhaps most of all, paul robeson for me, paul robeson was the sparrow. he was an artist who made those of us in the arts understand the deaths of that calling when he said, artists are the gatekeepers of truth. we are the civilizations' radical voice. never in the history of black america has there ever been such a harvest of truly gifted and powerful artists, and yet our nation hunters -- hungers for the radical song. in the field of sports, our presence dominates. in the landscape of corporate power, we have more african- american president and leaders of industry then we have ever known. yet we still suffer from abject poverty and moral malnutrition. our only hope lies in the recall of the moment which has been referred to earlier here, and was my last meeting with dr. king just before he left to go off to meant this to join the strike was sanitation workers. he held a strategy meeting and dr. king -- the meeting was in my home. dr. king during the meeting appeared to be dist
've been missing something. >> do you play golf now? >> no, but i do have a picture of eleanor roosevelt over my bed. >> it will be fine. melissa, this reality tv series, in part, deals with the fact that when mom is out in l.a., she lives with you. >> yes. >> how does that work? >> how did that work? >> yeah. >> well, it -- i'm very patient. >> yeah. >> in one sense it's wonderful for my son and for myself, but, i mean, my mom stays with me. no, you're living with me. there is a difference. and it's -- it's great but it's trying. >> i don't see you puttering around the house, making a coffee cake or something like that. you get involved? >> oh, you have no idea. >> her hello is like, why haven't you changed this light bulb? did you notice this needs to be washed? it's constant. >> let's talk about -- you're a divorced parent. when your ex comes back into the picture. >> he was there. >> your son as well. how does that go? are those episodes? >> those are episodes. one of the things we decided to explore a little bit this year is the fact that my ex-husband and i actually finally have a
caller: i didn't understand the question. i am 77. i remember eleanor roosevelt. 77. host: we will go on to thomas in illinois. caller: good morning. i do not think we should generalize this. it depends on the first lady, the issue, the president. bill clinton was the first lady. i would like to see him go through ego management. the first lady, should be open to criticism if he makes comments about policy and even ridicule. host: a contributor had this to say about the first lady the we have not talked about. [video clip] >> nelly taft interests me more than the others on the list. she was very bright, very astute politically. had she been male, would have gone into politics herself. that was not possible and that era. picked a man that would take her into politics and made her his first priority. she acted out her fantasy of wanting to be in the white house. i think that makes for interesting as far as a first lady. host: part of our first lady series. c-span conducted a poll online in conjunction for this series. host: 56% of male say no to pushing for policy positions. nancy in pe
to make history. you're not going to be an eleanor roosevelt unless a woman of her generation was willing to step out o the noalirst lady role take a more public position on issues that were important to her. whether i agreed with her issues or not, you won't succeed. >> rose: you've made history because of this appointment to the supreme court. do you want to make history in terms of what you do on the bench? >> well, if what you're talking about is that somehow you're going to write opinions that are going to create wle cloth a new direion r the courttor society -- >> rose: yes. >> you don't want to do that? >> no. >> rose: why not? >> because i'm a great respecter of the law. >> rose: can't you respect the law and believe the law is imperfect? >> absolutely. and that's why -- >> rose: believe that you may have the opportunity in the sense? think of brown. have board of education. >> absolutely. and there may be a case. >> rose: that's a historic decision! and there may be a case in which i look at what our precedents have been and enough time and evidence is demonstrated like in "brown
were campaigning behind the scenes. certainly eleanor roosevelt was extremely active in the campaign. by the time you get to mamie eisenhower, she was the one who accompanied her husband to the west will stop -- to the whistle stop. that is a real watershed. after mamie, you cannot have a presidential wife who is not involved visibly in the campaign. >> harding had a front porch campaign, too. >> winded first ladies began to take platforms? the literacy campaign with barbara bush -- >> i would say ladybird johnson, "lets beautify america." >> and certainly jacqueline kennedy in raid -- in renovating the white house, which i thought was a brilliant stroke because she was still involved with the national home, so people are not in fear that she should be interfering with. it was so much based on scholarship and the decorative arts that after that it is very difficult to see a first lady without some kind of cause. >> about lady bird, i think "beautify america" was code for "look at the environment." it wasn't just the white house. i think she was really on the cutting edge of modern da
, edith wilson, eleanor roosevelt, the truman, mamie eisenhower, you can see that each woman has defined the role in a way that is true to herself. how she can take care of her husband, take care of her family and make a contribution to our nation. >> first ladies, their influence and image, produced with the white house historical association. season one begins feb. 80 at 9:00 p.m. and pacific. >> president obama on wednesday nominated the ceo sally jule as secretary to replace ken salazar that will leave in march. at this event, we also hear from outgoing secretary salazar. >> please have a seat. everybody is so formal. well, good afternoon, everybody. the department of the interior is actually the department of america. other members of my cabinet may not entirely agree with that statement but you can see where he's coming from. secretary of the interior is in charge of overseeing 500 million acres of public land, including places like yellowstone and the grand canyon and protecting our natural heritage for our children and our grandchildren and their children to come. but the job als
power seized them and took the opportunity. and i was thinking of eleanor roosevelt and when you were thinking of paul and essie's relationship, because that sounds how their evolved into the collegial and very respectful relationship, and eleanor used that privilege and really did try to open up pathways and which i think is pretty great to use that opportunity to make it into something good. >> i have a question, because as you were describing this, there is a tradition in american life of black celebrity leaders becoming political voices and not on quote, unquote black issues, but variety of images. mohammad muhammad ali took a great risk to his career and he was not utilizing the profit yield of his image, but he was as you described with with the robesons to take that to do something broader in politic, but to pick one, and beyonce at the super bowl and has the hbo show this week. >> just to pick one. >> just to pick one that i am obsessed with, but it is fair to say that jay and beyonce have stayed in a safe and mainstream democratic politics role and why thauld coy do tremendou
rights after world war ii. thanks in part to eleanor roosevelt who helped draft the u.n.'s declaration after her husband's death. today more than 70 countries recognize a right to health or health care in their constitutions. virtually every industrialized nation has taken steps to implement these rights by establishing some type of universal health coverage for their citizens. with one major exception. >> you can watch this and other programs online at booktv.org. >> guest: you have to understand that all the founders' primary concern, number one, numero uno, was with national security. so what would they say, for example, about a company such as lockheed? i'm of the opinion that based on how they acted in other instances they would have grudgingly favored a bailout of lockheed because it supplied the united states at the time with its top fighter jets and its top reconnaissance airplanes. i think you can make an argument that they would have supported, for example, the bailout of chrysler back in the 1980s but not the bailout of chrysler today. what's the difference? chrysler back th
a picture of eleanor roosevelt over my bed. >> it will be fine. melissa, this reality tv series, in part, deals with the fact that when mom is out in l.a., she lives with you. >> yes. >> how does that work? >> how did that work? >> yeah. >> well, it -- i'm very patient. >> yeah. >> in one sense it's wonderful for my son and for myself, but, i mean, my mom stays with me. no, you're living with me. there is a difference. and it's -- it's great but it's trying. >> i don't see you puttering around the house, making a coffee cake or something like that. you get involved? >> oh, you have no idea. >> her hello is like, why haven't you changed this light bulb? did you notice this needs to be washed? it's constant. >> let's talk about -- you're a divorced parent. when your ex comes back into the picture. >> he was there. >> your son as well. how does that go? are those episodes? >> those are episodes. one of the things we decided to explore a little bit this year is the fact that my ex-husband and i actually finally have a very good relationship. and we are co-parenting a child together, who is n
washington or abigail adams or dolly madison or edith wilson or eleanor roosevelt or beth truman, you can see that each woman has defined the role in a way that is true to herself. how she can help her husband take care of her family, make her contribution to our nation. >> c-span's new original series "first ladies: influence and image." their public and private lives, entrance and their influence on the president. over 44 administrations. produced with the white house historical association. season one begins president's day, february 18, at 9:00 p.m. eastern and pacific on c-span, c-span radio and c-span.org. the british house of commons yesterday voted 400-175 to allow gay marriage in the united kingdom. the prime minister spoke about the issue this morning saying it will, quote, promote marriage, defend marriage and encourage marriage. report will help that to happen. >> last night, trying to last night's vote on same-sex marriage is widely regarded as a historic vote. does the prime minister agree with me it's a tribute to all the people in all parties and no party, behind the scenes an
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 65 (some duplicates have been removed)